A Reckoning in Boston @RoxFilm and A Tale of Three Chinatowns @RoxFilm

Shared Stories Film Series

JUN 23-27, 2021

About Shared Stories

ArtsEmerson presents Shared Stories, a film series in collaboration with the Boston Asian American Film Festival (BAAFF), Boston Latino International Film Festival (BLIFF), and the Roxbury International Film Festival (RoxFilm) seeking to build community, shared conversation, and experiences through cinema. This pilot series aspires to create a shared space to find commonality across experiences, and encourage the exchange of stories and ideas.

Two films presented as part of Shared Stories linked together by common themes of racial tensions, socio-economic justice, housing disparities, gentrification - and the power of advocacy.


A Reckoning in Boston @RoxFilm

Premiere: JUN 24 @ 5:00PM ET
On Demand: JUN 24 @ 5:00PM ET – JUN 26 @ 5:00PM ET

LIVE Q&A: JUN 24 @ 6:30PM ET

$10 | 83 mins | Ages 13+ Mature content: Gun violence
In English with captions
Director/Producer/Writer/Editor: James Rutenbeck 
Producers: Carl Chandler & Kafi Dixon

A White filmmaker comes into a Black community looking for transformation in the lives of low-income adults enrolled in a night course in the Humanities. As he spends more time with the students, he’s awakened to the violence, racism and gentrification that threaten their very place in the city.

Post-film conversation with filmmakers.


James Rutenbeck


James Rutenbeck

James Rutenbeck’s nonfiction films have screened at various forums including Cinema du Reel, Museum of Modern Art, National Gallery and the Flaherty Film Seminar. James is a two-time recipient of theAlfred I. du Pont Columbia Journalism Award for his work as producer of the PBS series Unnatural Causes and Class of '27, which is streaming as the Editor's Pick of the Atlantic.


Carl Chandler


Carl Chandler

Carl Chandler is a Boston-born first time filmmaker whose ancestry is Black, Indigenous American and western European. Because he felt that his people were not respected or embraced by America, Carl made the calculation early in life to opt out of chasing the material excesses of the so-called “American Dream.” Throughout his life he has given lectures and presentations on indigienous culture in southern New England as his small contribution to the education of young people until he found the Clemente Course in the Humanities, giving him new direction.


Kafi Dixon


Kafi Dixon

Kafi Dixon has worked as a gravedigger, fishmonger, retail merchant, Boston bus driver, community organizer and mother of three. She is certified as an urban farmer by the City of Boston. A former Clemente Course student, Kafi has worked closely with the film’s director James Rutenbeck for the last three years. She is currently lead organizer for the Common Good Cooperative, an urban farm and cooperative for poor and working-class women of color in Dorchester, Massachusetts. This is her first film.

“Don’t miss this powerful film that lays bare the transformative force of the humanities in our lives in these turbulent and troubling times!”

- Cornel West, Former Professor of the Practice of Public Philosophy, Harvard University
 

Get Tickets to A Reckoning in Boston @RoxFilm


A Tale of Three Chinatowns @RoxFilm

Premiere: JUN 23 @ 8:00PM ET
On Demand: JUN 23 @ 8:00PM ET – JUN 27 @ 10:00PM ET

$10 | 90 mins | All Ages
In English
Director: Lisa Mao
Executive Producer: Penny Lee

BOSTON PREMIERE
A Tale of Three Chinatowns explores the survival of urban ethnic neighborhoods. Specifically examining Chinatowns in three American cities, the film looks at the forces altering each community and the challenges that go with them.The film profiles Chinatowns in Washington, D.C., Chicago, and Boston and features the voices of residents, community activists, developers, government officials, and others who have a connection to this ubiquitous neighborhood. Through these perspectives, the film presents the present day pressing topic of urban development and gentrification through the eyes of those on the frontlines. Chicago’s Chinatown is a story of growth where the Asian-American population has increased and its borders have expanded. In contrast, Washington, D.C.’s Chinatown has dwindled to an estimated population of 300 residents of Chinese descent. The Chinatown neighborhood in Boston finds itself somewhere in between these two extremes as various groups fight for the land on which it sits.

Post-film conversation with filmmakers.


Lisa Mao


Lisa Mao

Lisa Mao is a documentary producer, writer and director. Her credits include the award-winning documentary “Through Chinatown’s Eyes: April 1968”, Travel Channel’s “Man Vs. Food Nation,” and “Ultimate Factories” on National Geographic Channel. In addition to her Executive Producer role at the Travel Channel and programming role at Discovery Channel International, Mao has headed program development for various production companies. She is responsible for the launch of over 500 hours of programming on channels including National Geographic Channel, HGTV, History Channel, Discovery Channel, TLC, Animal Planet, Travel Channel, PBS, Smithsonian Channel, and Reelz. Throughout her work, Mao is committed to helping people share their stories to reveal the complex and unique fabric of the human condition.


Penny Lee


Penny Lee

Penny Lee is a documentary producer, director and film/video editor. Through more than 25 years in editing and creating original content, she has worked on documentaries, feature and short films, reality television series, promotional infomercials, and educational videos for cable networks, corporate organizations, and associations. Lee produced, directed and edited the award-winning documentary “Through Chinatown’s Eyes: April 1968”. In addition to her network projects, her passion for storytelling continues to drive her to create content highlighting the immigrant experience in the United States, with a primary focus on the Chinese-American voice.

 
 

Get Tickets to A Tale of Three Chinatowns @RoxFilm